5 Things to Know About Taylor Swift’s 3-Night Stand in Philly

Taylor Swift performs during "The Eras Tour" on Friday, May 5, 2023, at Nissan Stadium in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/George Walker IV)

By Patrick Berkery

May 9, 2023

With excitement for the Berks County native’s Pennsylvania homecoming reaching a fever pitch, let’s take a look at five things you should know about Swift’s three-night stand at Lincoln Financial Field.

If you got tickets to see Taylor Swift in Philadelphia when they went on sale back in November, consider yourself lucky. It was a tough ticket to get in many ways, no thanks to Ticketmaster’s botched Verified Fan presale, an event that was so plagued with problems that state attorneys general, like our current Gov. Josh Shapiro, got involved.

But the worst is behind you, Swifties. Reviews of the sold-out “Eras” tour have been overwhelmingly positive, and, finally, the colossally huge trek arrives in Swift’s home state of Pennsylvania this weekend for three shows at Lincoln Financial Field, Friday through Sunday. 

The Berks County native will return to the commonwealth next month for two shows at Pittsburgh’s Acrisure Stadium on June 16 and 17.

With excitement for Swift’s sort-of homecoming (her hometown of Wyomissing is a mere 65 miles from Philly) reaching a fever pitch, let’s take a look at five things you should know about her three-night stand at the Linc, starting with the most important one…

1.You Can Still Buy Tickets!

But it will cost you. A lot. About a month’s rent/mortgage—and that’s for the nosebleeds.

The easiest way to get tickets is the costliest: ticket resellers like StubHub and Seatgeek. And to get the best deal, you should buy tickets in pairs. As of Tuesday morning, field seats purchased as a pair ranged from $2,556 each (before fees) to sit way in the back, all the way up to $12,825 per ticket to sit in the sixth row. Even obstructed view seats in the upper level run from $1,282 each (in a pair) to $1,729.

But you may not have to drop thousands to get in. Without warning or any kind of apparent pattern, Ticketmaster has been randomly releasing tickets for Swift shows at the last-minute, sometimes even after the show has started. Got enough time on your hands to chain yourself to a computer or phone you’re constantly refreshing? You may end up seeing Swift just yet.

2. You’re in For a Long Night, With a Lot of Songs

According to setlist.fm, Swift’s shows on the “Eras” tour have been averaging 3 hours and 17 minutes. The set usually contains between 43-45 songs, with all the hits, and two “surprise” songs each night exclusive to that stop on the tour. Oh, and there’s two openers for each show: Phoebe Bridgers and Gayle open on Friday and Saturday. On Sunday, it’s Phoebe Bridgers and Gracie Abrams. The Friday and Saturday shows start at 7:00 p.m., while Sunday starts at 6:30 p.m. Bottom line: you’re not walking out of the Linc until well after midnight.

3. It’s an Elaborate Production

There’s more to this show than songs. There’s a giant catwalk that runs the length of the field. A mossy cabin where Swift performs songs from the “folklore” album. There’s stunts, dozens of costume changes, giant video screens, and lights. Lots and lots of lights.

4. These Shows are South Philly Record Breakers 

Swift will become the first artist to play three consecutive nights at Lincoln Financial Field. Bruce Springsteen did three shows there in 2003, but not in a row. Swift has previously done two-night stands at the Linc in 2018 (the last time she played Philly), 2015, and 2013, and played a single show there in 2011. Before that, Swift played the former Wachovia Center (since re-branded as the Wells Fargo Center) three times: once in 2009, twice in 2010.

5. These Shows Mark 21 Years Since Swift First Played South Philly

Maybe you don’t remember a 12-year-old Swift singing the national anthem at a Sixers game in 2002. She also sang the anthem (while playing guitar) before a Phillies World Series game in 2008.

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