US Rep. Madeleine Dean, D-Pennsylvania, and other members take cover as domestic terrorists disrupt the joint session of Congress to certify the Electoral College vote on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021. (CQ-Roll Call Photo via Getty Images/Tom Williams) Madeleine Dean Evacuates
US Rep. Madeleine Dean, D-Pennsylvania, and other members take cover as domestic terrorists disrupt the joint session of Congress to certify the Electoral College vote on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021. (CQ-Roll Call Photo via Getty Images/Tom Williams)

Several explained how they experienced the chaos of the attempted coup.

WASHINGTON, DC — Mobs of President Donald Trump’s supporters stormed the US Capitol on Wednesday just as Congress began the process of certifying President Elect Joe Biden’s victory in the November election. 

The chaos they brought left members of Congress locked down in their offices or other secure locations.

Representatives shared their experiences on social media, including Rep. Brendan Boyle, D-Philadelphia.

As he was sheltering in the Longworth Office Building because protestors had stormed the Capitol, Boyle called in to MSNBC around 2:30 p.m. Wednesday afternoon.

“Obviously, I have never experienced anything like this,” he said from his office.

He talked about hearing explosions, having to lock his doors and repeatedly getting alerts through his computer system. 

Boyle told anchors Chuck Todd, Katie Tur, and Andrea Mitchell that his staff had been prepared for a “long night” and to take precautions during the day, like using the underground tunnels system.

However, he said, he didn’t expect chaos to arrive so early in the proceedings.

“This is much worse than I was anticipating,” Boyle said.

Rep. Chrissy Houlahan, D-Chester, told MSNBC she was making her way to the Capitol around 1 p.m. when she, “Watched the people literally crashing the gates of The People’s House.”

She described the experience as “offensive” and “maddening” to Rachel Maddow during the interview around 5 p.m.

Houlahan said the building didn’t seem secure yet. Because of that, Congress might have to work somewhere else.

“I have heard conversation that we may move to some other location,” she said, “but I haven’t heard confirmation of that.”

Those who weren’t in their offices at the time of the attacks were whisked away to safe rooms as the domestic terrorists breached the House and Senate chambers.

Some members of Pennsylvania’s congressional delegation took to Twitter to let supporters know they were safe.

They called for an end to the attacks: