8 Wildlife Sanctuaries in Pennsylvania Doing Their Part to Protect Nature

Wolves at the PA Wolf Sanctuary in Lititz. (Shutterstock)

By Ashley Adams

July 25, 2023

Pennsylvania is home to a wide variety of wildlife sanctuaries dedicated to protecting and preserving numerous different species of plants and animals.

Lions and tigers and bears! Oh my!

Yes, even in Pennsylvania there are lions, tigers, bears, as well as deer, elk, birds, monkeys, and so much more. That’s because the commonwealth is home to a plethora of nature oases and wildlife sanctuaries that preserve diverse ecosystems and incredible species.

If you’re a nature enthusiast, here are eight wildlife sanctuaries in the state you’ll definitely want to visit.

Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge – Stroudsburg

At the Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge, you can see wild turkeys strutting in the fields and warblers flitting around the trees and shrubs. You may even catch a glimpse of a bald eagle perched in a tree above the Cherry Creek. There is no shortage of sights or sounds at this wildlife refuge. There are two different trails that offer wildlife viewing for the whole family.

Refuge trails are open daily from sunrise to sunset.

Wolf Sanctuary of PA – Lititz

For more than 40 years, the Wolf Sanctuary of PA has provided a refuge to gray wolves and wolf-dogs on over 80 acres of natural woodland. Through guided tours you can view the more than 50 wolves that live at the sanctuary.

Tours are available Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays starting at 10 a.m. Admission is $19.50 for adults, $18.50 for seniors, and $17.50 for kids ages 11 and younger.

T&D’s Cats of the World – Penns Creek

T&D’s Cats of the World provides a safe haven for unwanted, abused, and mistreated exotic pets and wild animals. The sanctuary is home to bears, leopards, lions, tigers, monkeys, and much more. Guided tours are available Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 6 p.m. Admission is $15 for adults and $10 for kids ages 3 to 12.

8 Wildlife Sanctuaries in Pennsylvania Doing Their Part to Protect Nature

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary at sunrise, Pennsylvania, USA

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary – Kempton

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary promotes the conservation of birds of prey at its 2,600 acre sanctuary through lectures, workshops, programs, and events. You can immerse yourself in the native habitat of raptors and other predatory birds on any of the more than eight miles of hiking trails.

The visitor center is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for kids ages 6 to 12.

Dorflinger-Suydam Wildlife Sanctuary – White Mills

Dorflinger-Suydam Wildlife Sanctuary is a 600-acre wildlife sanctuary and glass museum dedicated to the preservation of woodlands and open spaces.

The wildlife sanctuary trails are open daily from 8 a.m. to dusk. The glass museum and gift shop is open Wednesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m.

Black Rock Sanctuary – Phoenixville

Black Rock Sanctuary is 119 acres of wetlands, woodlands, and meadows that offer a wonderful opportunity to relax and discover the history, geology, wildlife, plant life, and habitats of the desilting basin along the Schuylkill River.

The sanctuary is open daily from 8 a.m. to dusk.

8 Wildlife Sanctuaries in Pennsylvania Doing Their Part to Protect Nature

John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum – Philadelphia

The John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum is a 1,000 acre wildlife refuge located adjacent to the Philadelphia International Airport and is the largest remaining freshwater tidal marsh in Pennsylvania. The refuge protects the habitat of hundreds of species of plants, trees, birds, insects and mammals.

With more than 10 miles of trails, the refuge provides numerous opportunities for visitors to connect with nature. The visitor center is open Wednesday to Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Erie National Wildlife Refuge – Guys Mills

The Erie National Wildlife Refuge is an 8,777 acre wildlife refuge comprising wetland habitats, including beaver ponds, emergent marshes, wet meadows, forested wetlands, and creeks that provide a habitat for a variety of migratory birds and waterfowl.

The refuge includes several scenic trails, an observation deck, and fishing pier.

Author

  • Ashley Adams

    In her 16 years in the communications industry, Ashley Adams has worn many hats, including news reporter, public relations writer, marketing specialist, copy editor and technical writer. Ashley grew up in Berks County and has since returned to her roots to raise her three children.

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