Lehigh County Moms for Liberty chapter dissolves itself following 2023 election

A sign outside the Moms for Liberty conference in Philadelphia. (Photo: Sean Kitchen)

By Sean Kitchen

February 8, 2024

“I guess there wasn’t as much willingness to do the work that’s required to propel the movement forward,” Janine Vicalvi, who founded the local chapter in 2020, told The Daily Beast.

The Lehigh County Moms for Liberty chapter recently dissolved after their membership evaporated from 200 members to three, according to a story published in The Daily Beast on Thursday.

It’s just the latest bad news for the book-banning, anti-LGBTQ extremist organization.

Voters overwhelmingly rejected Moms for Liberty-endorsed school board candidates this past Election Day. The Keystone reported in November that Moms for Liberty backed 130 school-board candidates across the country and won only one-third of their races.

Democrats successfully swept school board races in the Central Bucks and Pennridge school districts and won control of the boards after they became subject to a never ending stream of controversies.

The Daily Beast reported that the Lehigh County Moms for Liberty chapter held their final meeting last Tuesday, after the three remaining members voted to dissolve the local group. Their membership peaked around 200 in 2020.

The group’s decline started after the election, when only 20 people attended their December meeting. It continued to wither from there.

Janine Vicalvi, who originally founded the local chapter in 2020, told The Daily Beast that she reached her end point.

“Between homeschooling and working two jobs, it’s just a lot,” she said. “And I guess there wasn’t as much willingness to do the work that’s required to propel the movement forward.”

After their last meeting, Vicalvi took to the group’s Facebook page and said, “so we had our meeting this evening and are going to dissolve our chapter.”



Author

  • Sean Kitchen

    Sean Kitchen is the Keystone’s political correspondent, based in Harrisburg. Sean is originally from Philadelphia and spent five years working as a writer and researcher for Pennsylvania Spotlight.

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