The University of Pennsylvania (Shutterstock)
The University of Pennsylvania (Shutterstock)

More than a dozen Pennsylvania schools are among the top 250 colleges and universities in the nation, according to US News and World Report’s recent rankings.

The University of Pennsylvania climbed into the top 10 in US News and World Report’s latest rankings of the nation’s best colleges, while Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Mellon University cracked the top 25..

UPenn was the highest-ranked Pennsylvania school, placing seventh overall, tied with Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Philadelphia’s Ivy League school also ranked 18th in Best School Value.

Carnegie Mellon University came in at 22nd on the overall rankings. Lehigh University in Bethlehem and Villanova University in Villanova followed, both tied at 51st. 

The other Pennsylvania colleges and universities that made the top 250 of the national rankings include:

  • Chatham University (Pittsburgh) – #194
  • Drexel University (Philadelphia) – #105
  • Duquesne University (Pittsburgh) – #151
  • Immaculata University (East Whiteland Township) – #250
  • La Salle University (Philadelphia) – #202
  • Misericordia University (Dallas) – #219
  • The Pennsylvania State University (University Park) – #77
  • Robert Morris University (Moon Township) – #194
  • Temple University (Philadelphia) – #121
  • Thomas Jefferson University (Philadelphia) – #127
  • University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh) – #62
  • West Chester University of Pennsylvania (West Chester) – #250
  • Widener University (Chester) – #219
  • Wilkes University (Wilkes-Barre) – #234

US News assesses 1,500 bachelor’s degree-granting institutions throughout the country and ranks them based on 17 measures of academic quality, including graduation rates, financial resources, graduate indebtedness, and undergraduate academic reputation, among others.
The rankings have drawn criticism over the years, with critics claiming that the rankings prioritize exclusivity and prestige over other factors, and that the report relies on information submitted by the colleges themselves without independent verification. Current Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona called the rankings “a joke” earlier this year.